Home » Catalog » New & Recent Releases   My Account  Cart Contents  Checkout
Light and Dark and In Between: 4 Organs in Baltimore
Diane Luchese, Organist
*****Five Star Review, Choir & Organ - [OAR-964]
$15.98

Great Review from Robert Delcamp in The American Record Guide, July/August 2016! see below, bottom of page
*****Five Star Review in Choir & Organ, May/June 2016! 
see below, at bottom of page
Great Review from Robert Matthew-Walker in The Organ
  see below, at bottom of page

Diane Luchese plays four landmark organs in Baltimore in repertoire of the 20th and 21st centuries.

Cathedral of Mary Our Queen - 2007 Schantz 130 ranks
Olivier Messiaen: Adoro te from Livre du Saint Sacrement
Jean-Louis Florentz: Pleurs de la Vierge from Les Laudes, op. 5

Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church - 1931 Skinner Organ Co. 4m

Keith Carpenter: Sister Rosetta Calling the Sinners Home
John Cage: Souvenir
Pozzi Escot: Mirabilis IV

Christ Lutheran Church 2007 Andover - 82 ranks
Sofia Gubaidulina: Hell un Dunkel
Arvo Pärt: Annum per annum
Robert Cogan: No Attack of Organic Metals

Mount Calvary Church  - 1961 Andover (C B. Fisk)

Mauricio Kagel: Râga; Rondeña
György Ligeti: Harmonies

Light and Dark and In Between
A Progressive Recital Featuring Four Organs in Baltimore

Diane Luchese, organist

As in many other facets of our civilization, the past few decades have also introduced increasingly rapid changes and technological advancements to both the art of organ building and musical composition for the pipe organ, demonstrating the vibrant health of one of humanity's oldest musical instruments. From its third-century BCE roots, the organ continues to evolve, and treasured historical instruments that have survived over several centuries inform and inspire contemporary builders in their designs and creative experimentation. Composers continue to exploit the organ's capabilities, some venturing to push the envelope of expressive possibilities. The abundance of contemporary repertoire and variety in available instruments testify to this vital time in the organ's history. This CD aspires to create a kind of time capsule that both samples eclectic compositional styles of the past 50 years and captures a few diverse examples of pipe organs one might typically encounter in a representative American city.

The format of this CD is that of a progressive organ recital featuring four organs in Baltimore, Maryland. Taken together, these instruments represent a range of aesthetics in design within 75 years of organ building practices. The oldest of the four is the 45-rank electropneumatic Skinner Organ Company instrument (op. 839) at Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church, installed in 1931, with tonal finishing by G. Donald Harrison. In sharp contrast, and also of historical importance, is the 51-rank Andover-Flentrop (op. 35) at Mount Calvary Church, built by Charles B. Fisk in 1961, employing both mechanical key and stop actions. This historically-inspired instrument was built just prior to Fisk changing his company's name to C. B. Fisk, Inc. Two installations from 2007 are also included: an 81-rank Andover (op. 114) at Christ Lutheran Church with mechanical key action in the manuals and electric key action in the pedals; and an electropneumatic 126-rank Schantz (op. 2275) at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, which includes the resources from its earlier 1959 M. P. Möller (op. 9200). The program begins at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen. Just as I was to begin playing the Messiaen movement, the noon bell at the Cathedral began tolling, and so it seemed fitting to include it here.

The innovative techniques of Olivier Messiaen's musical language helped position him amongst the most significant twentieth-century composers, and his acclaimed contributions to modern organ literature have now become standard repertoire. Messiaen's lifelong technical explorations with rhythm, time, pitch constructions, birdsong, symmetry, texture, and color, coupled with his supreme desire to express intangible spiritual mysteries, shaped a distinctly unique and compelling compositional voice. The Cavaillé-Coll organin the magnificent space of Sainte-Trinité in Paris, where Messiaen played for decades in his position as organistinspired creative experimentation with organ timbre that often resulted in unconventional registrations. Adoro te (I adore Thee), the opening movement from Messiaen's last organ composition, Livre du Saint Sacrement, is an expression of adoration to the unseen presence of Christ in the Holy Eucharist. This movement's slow tempo and arch form, registered in a conventionally Romantic manner with full foundation stops and Swell reeds that crescendo to full organ and then subside, is reminiscent of his earlier work, Apparition de léglise éternelle. Despite the similarities, fifty years later Adoro te asserts itself as a mature work that exemplifies the culmination of Messiaen's harmonic practices. The diverse harmonic constructions (e.g., modal harmonies, added-note chords, superposed chords, chords of resonance, both whole tone and chromatic chords) project a rich palette of colors. These slowly unfolding harmonies create a monolithic sonic atmosphere conducive to prayerful adoration, which the highly reverberant acoustics at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen fully support.

Messiaen taught many gifted pupils, including Jean-Louis Florentz. In addition to Messiaen's influence, the study of natural sciences and ethnomusicology played a profound role in Florentz's stylistic development. He served as a Professor of Ethnomusicology at the Conservatoire de Lyon 1985-2000. Florentz's ethnomusicological work included trips to parts of Africa, where he studied the Ethiopian Orthodox Christian liturgy. Pleurs de la Vierge (Tears of the Virgin) is the fifth of the seven movements that constitute his first organ cycle, Les Laudes, op. 5. Its subtitle, Kidan za-Nageh (or Morning Office), reflects the works derivation from the Ethiopian liturgy, and the intention behind Laudes is to solemnly honor the Virgin Mary. Florentz states that he tried to make these Laudes musical icons of Mary weeping for the persecution of Ethiopia, but they should also be regarded as songs of hope in a world delivered from tribulations and wars. In a 1993 article written by the composer in Contemporary Music Review, he stresses the importance of organ timbre in this work, and explains his employment of mutation stops, reeds, and several fundamentals at the same pitch level to produce harmonic vibratos. In addition to the undulations resulting from his conceived registrations, other prominent style features found in this movement include the use of cross rhythms, modal language, incantation- like phrasing, and heterophonic texture adapted to the organ.

Unlike Florentz and Messiaen, who were quite meticulous with respect to notating specific registrations in their scores, Sofia Gubaidulina's Hell und Dunkel (Light and Dark) explores organ timbre chiefly through juxtaposed contrasts and densities, rather than through precise registrations. In a conversation that appeared in 1998 in Perspectives of New Music, Gubaidulina (born in Chistopol) asserts that her intention as a composer is to strive for depth as opposed to innovation, although the vivid timbres and instrumental effects that characterize her music nevertheless capture listeners with their often-novel execution. Her music departed from the compositional norms associated with the aesthetic principles of Soviet Russia, and she credits the support of Shostakovich with helping her remain true to herself and continue developing along her individual path. And yet, in 1979, Gubaidulina was blacklisted as one of Khrennikov's Seven at the Sixth Congress of the Union of Soviet Composers for her unapproved participation in several festivals of Soviet music in the West, where music other than the appropriate representation desired was presented. Hell und Dunkel was composed three years prior to this official denunciation. Gubaidulina's exploration of light and dark presents a variety of oppositions: high vs. low registers, loud vs. soft, short melodic fragments vs. sustaining harmonies, quick notes vs. long sustained notes, ascent vs. descent, chromatic vs. diatonic clusters, conjunct vs. disjunct figuration, and interval inversions (2nds/7ths and spans of 3rds/6ths). The essentially ascending trajectory and increasing momentum of the exposition is reversed in the recapitulation. Following the climax, the denouement features figuration that descends eventually to the pedal as soft, diatonic clusters simultaneously ascend. Distinguishing features of her compositional style are evident throughout, e.g., ametrical rhythms, glissandi, tremolos, chromaticism, a rough relief, and a preference for motivic segments over long melodies.

Like Gubaidulina, Estonian-born Arvo Pârt struggled with the Soviet regime. After facing a compositional crisis, his study of plainsong and early European polyphony inspired a new direction, with spirituality and simplicity at the core. This breakthrough in the 1970s led to the development of his tintinnabuli style, which features a technique essentially consisting of a melodic voice (M-voice) synchronous with another voice that sounds the tones of a tonic triad (T-voice). Annum per annum (Year by year) consists of five movements (K-G-C-S-A) that correspond to the five sections of the Mass Ordinary (Kyrie-Gloria-Credo-Sanctus-Agnus Dei), which are celebrated daily, year by year. These movements are similarly constructed of two sections that are each four measures long, with the exception of the extended second section of A, which twice repeats its final measure in ascending registers. At the works midpoint (halfway through C), the mode switches from minor to major. Despite many similarities among the movements, Pärt's specific registrations and the right hand figuration help each achieve distinct individuality. The five movements are framed with an introduction and a coda; both employ an iambic rhythm that intones the pitches D and A, mesmerizing the ear to the D tonic governing the entire piece. Although the introduction begins fortissimo, after about 50 seconds the blower is switched off and the intoning continues until the wind is depleted. The diminishing wind on the Andover organ at Christ Lutheran Church allows for a vivid sonic experience, so I urge you to turn up the volume. Finally, the coda begins pianissimo and crescendos to full organ in approximately 40 seconds.

That an organ can sustain indefinitely when its motor is kept on is just one of its superpowers. Composer/theorist Robert Cogan wrote in his award-winning text, New Images of Musical Sound, Unbreathing or superbreathing, organs in any case are ancient sound synthesizers. Cogan's groundbreaking theoretical work in tone color analysis is on par with the technical precision and sensitivity to timbre exhibited in his own compositional designs. No Attack of Organic Metals explores connections between pre-recorded sounds and those of the organ. As Cogan states, No Attack of Organic Metals originated in the surprising idea that there exist many potential analogies between organ sounds and the sounds of our everyday electromechanical environment. In performance, speakers are placed near the pipes so that as the organ sonorities are complementing, contrasting, or in dialogue with the electromechanical sounds, one will not always be distinguishable from the other. In addition to the organ and pre-recorded sounds, slide whistle and vocal utterances contribute to the texture. To indicate the various complexities of his performance instructions, Cogan developed a graphic notation whereby the durations of events are indicated by seconds, and pitches (whether played or sustained by key weights) are indicated by letter names and register numbers. (See the sample page from this score.) The two assistants required for performance assist with registration changes, the placement of weights on the keyboards, and the vocal sounds. Near the end, an extended climactic section combining organ, electromechanical sounds, and vocal cries leads to an impressive pulsation, resulting from the acoustical beating of the sustaining A# and B that conclude the piece. Originally composed in 1973, this recorded performance uses the revised edition from 2012.

American-born composer Keith Carpenter's earliest musical experiences were playing guitar in rock bands. Formal compositional training followed in American universities and through additional studies with Tristan Murail and Louis Andriessen. Carpenter's passion for American vernacular music is often displayed idiomatically in his music. Rosetta refers to gospel singer/songwriter/guitarist Sister Rosetta Tharpe, whose spiritual lyrics and rhythmically rocking accompaniments crossed over style boundaries onto new soulful terrains, influencing numerous subsequent artists that include Elvis Presley, Little Richard, and Jimi Hendrix. Composed in 2014, Sister Rosetta Calling the Sinners Home explores the invisible boundary between traditional sacred liturgical music and gospel music. While it is somewhat common to differentiate sacred pipe organ literature from gospel performance on Hammond electronic organs, both are essentially concerned with spiritual expression. Carpenter's piece, conceived specifically for pipe organ sonority, achieves common ground between contemporary sacred organ music i.e., of composers such as Olivier Messiaen and Arvo Pärt and stylistic elements found in gospel church music, e.g., soulful melodies, syncopation, swing rhythms, and blue notes. The colorful solo stops and warm strings of the Skinner organ at Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church provide ample registration possibilities for Carpenter's expressive thematic material.

Few, if any, composers have challenged our basic assumptions about music more than John Cage. Although his organ compositions are few in number, one that has captured world attention is Organ2/ASLSP, currently in the midst of a 639-year realization that is taking place in Halberstadt, Germany on a superbreathing organ simultaneously growing as the performance unfolds. Through the six-plus centuries still remaining to complete that performance, we are almost guaranteed that the king of instruments has a long life ahead (at least until September 5, 2640). Just four years preceding the composition of Organ2/ASLSP, Cage completed Souvenir, which was commissioned by the American Guild of Organists. The form of Souvenir can be described as a chain of six short thematic ideas linked together and then restated two additional times. Except for the opening theme, which modifies slightly with each iteration, the other ideas restate exactly. Regarding the fourth idea, beneath the sustaining manual chords (which I registered with strings), Cage notates the pedal part on two different staves. I realized this passage taking advantage of the pedal divide system found on the current console at Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church. Souvenir's nonlinearity, circular form of repeating themes, unchanging heptatonic pitch collection, and steady meter imbue it with the characteristic of monotony, while at the same time we areparadoxicallyengaged with unpredictable surprises.

In the Preface to his score, Mauricio Kagel explains,  Rrrrrrr . . . consists of 41 autonomous pieces of music, all performable separately and all beginning with the letter R. The respective instrumental settings (organ; choir and piano; percussion duo; wind instruments, double basses and percussion; solo voices; jazz combo) are published in separate volumes. A performance of all 41 pieces constitutes the Radio Phantasy Rrrrrrr . . . . Kagel's individual titles within originate from different languages; most titles are words somehow related to music (e.g., Râga, Ripieno, Ragtime-Waltz, Rondeña, Rauschpfeifen), while other titles are simply programmatic (e.g., Rossignols enrhumés, Railroad Drama). The organ volume is comprised of eight pieces, the first and fifth of which are presented here. The first title, Râga, brings to mind modes or melodic formulae that form the basis of Indian improvisations and compositions. What is especially striking about this piece is its entirely monophonic texture, absent of a drone that we might hear if this were music in an Indian style. Rondeña, the title of the fifth piece, is one of the regional variants (from Ronda) of the fandango, a Spanish dance. For this piece I chose a single flute stop on each manual to execute Kagel's pianissimo dynamic marking, although Kagel's score suggests that a very aggressive, bruitist interpretation of this piece is also possible: fff!

Although György Ligeti completed only four organ compositions, his contribution to organ literature can still be considered nothing less than significant. Breaking through conventional barriers, Ligeti's approach to the organ necessitates uncharacteristic playing techniques and manipulations to the instrument, thereby introducing listeners to foreign sonic landscapes. Harmonies is the first of his Zwei Etüden für Orgel. As the title suggests, the organist plays harmonies, i.e., a total of 230 chords that are comprised of ten pitches played using all ten fingers. In each measure, just one finger moves up or down by a half step in a somewhat symmetrical process to form a different harmony, the exception being the final few bars, where several fingers individually cease playing as the texture thins to simply three pitches and a single low C pedal note. The measures (or chord alterations) unfold without regularity or steady tempo. Although the organist is simply playing changing harmonies, listeners are unable to perceive the actual pitches played or the processes at work because Ligeti requires a denaturing of the sound by interfering with the organs wind, suggesting several solutions on how to achieve this. In this recorded performance, one assistant is slowly and continually changing the stops, which are pulled out only halfway so that the insufficient wind interferes with the pipes ability to produce clear pitches. Another assistant, positioned inside the organ, is manipulating the wind reservoir to destabilize the wind pressure. (A spectrogram of this recording of Harmonies appears on the cover.) In her book, The Poetics of Simple Mathematics in Music, Pozzi Escot analyzes this etude and unveils its beautiful proportions and symmetry, which Ligeti intentionally obscures and distorts in a ghostly fashion.

Composer/theorist Pozzi Escot's analytical writings elucidate both the significant structural features of compositions and also the mathematical niceties of symmetry, proportion, and geometry of some designs. Likewise, we can characterize Escot's music by its bold dissonances, angular melodic lines, contemporary pitch structures, nonlinearity, and free rhythms, as well as appreciate her musical expression of number and mathematics via concise forms and precisely crafted ideas that are devoid of extraneous development, wherein every single note convincingly asserts itself as an integral and deliberate part of a solid architectural framework. Mirabilis IV exemplifies this aesthetic through its well-proportioned formal design, use of the golden mean along temporal and spatial axes, symmetrical arrangement of pitch distribution, and employment of Fibonacci numbers. The geometry of Escot's sonic structures can also be appreciated visually in her notational practice, as you can see by the given sample page from her score. The works title is a reference to the text of Hildegard von Bingen's 1155 Antiphon O quam mirabilis est, although Mirabilis IV does not parody or resemble Hildegard's chant. In her Preface, Escot explains, Mirabilis IV is a plain chant without a text to be performed at any given time, and for all occasions, celebrating. As in all plain chants of our middle European world of over a thousand years ago, and the global view of original musics, Mirabilis IV has no indications of tempi, durations, dynamics, meters. And so this recording concludes where it began, in the awesome space of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen. This seemed an ideal setting for Escot's Mirabilis IV, a sublime and marvelous musical celebration of the creative forces and manifestations in the world around us.

Diane Luchese
Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, Baltimore, Maryland
Schantz Organ Co. Op. 2275, 2007, incorporating resources of M. P. Möller Op. 9200, 1959

Gallery Organ 104 Ranks, 75 stops; Sanctuary Organ 26 ranks, 22 stops

Gallery Great
16 Geigen Principal
8 Open Diapason
8 Geigen
8 Bourdon
8 Harmonic Flute
4 Principal
4 Spitz Flute
2-2/3 Octave Quinte
2 Super Octave
III-V Cornet 2
IV Mixture 2
III Scharf
16 Posaune
8 Trompete
Tremulant
8 State Trumpet
Chimes
Great 16 8 4
Swell to Great 16 8 4
Choir to Great 16 8 4
Positiv to Great 16 8 4
Bomb. to Great 16 8 4
Sanc. Sw. to Gr. 16 8 4

Gallery Bombarde expressive
8 Grand Diapason
4 Octave Major
V-VI Grave Mixture 2
IV-V Fourniture 2
VI-VIII Grand Chorus 2
8 English Horn
8 Orchestral Oboe
Tremulant
16 Bombarde
8 Trompette Harmonique
4 Clairon Harmonique
8 Tuba Major
16 State Trumpet
8 State Trumpet

Gallery Positiv
16 Holzquintade
8 Spitzprinzipal
8 Nason Flute
4 Prinzipal
4 Koppelflöte
2-2/3 Twelfth
2 Oktav
1-1/3 Larigot
1-3/5 Seventeenth
1 Sifflöte
IV Zimbel 1
8 Krummhorn
Tremulant

Gallery Swell expressive
16 Flauto Dolce
8 Principal
8 Salicional
8 Voix Celeste GG
8 Rohrflöte
8 Flauto Dolce
8 Flute Celeste GG
4 Prestant
4 Flauto Traverso
2-2/3 Nasard
2 Octavin
1-3/5 Tierce
V Plein Jeu 2
16 Contre Trompette
16 Basson
8 Trompette
8 Hautbois
4 Clairon
Tremulant
8 Vox Humana
Vox Humana Trem.
Swell 16 8 4
Positiv to Swell 8
Bombarde to Swell 8

Gallery Choir
expressive
8 Violoncello
8 Violoncello Celeste
8 Dolcan
8 Dolcan Celeste GG
8 Lieblich Gedeckt
4 Principal
4 Zauberflöte
2 Spillflöte
III Fourniture 1
16 Bass Clarinet
8 Clarinet
4 Rohrschalmei
Tremulant
Zimbelstern
8 State Trumpet
Choir 16 8 4
Swell to Choir 16 8 4
Great to Choir 8
Bomb. to Choir 16 8 4

Gallery Pedal
32 Major Bass
32 Violone
32 Soubasse
32 Resultant
16 Contrebasse
16 Geigenprincipal
16 Bourdon
16 Flauto Dolce
16 Holzquintade
10-2/3 Quinte
8 Octave
8 Geigen
8 Gedecktpommer
8 Flauto Dolce
5-1/3 Quinte
4 Super Octave
4 Nachthorn
2 Waldflöte
III Mixture
IV Mixture
32 Contre Bombarde
32 Contra Bassoon
16 Bombarde
16 Posaune
16 Basson
16 Bass Clarinet
8 Trompete
4 Krummhorn
2 Cornettino
16 State Trumpet
8 Trompette Harmonique
8 State Trumpet
Chimes
Great to Pedal 8 4
Swell to Pedal 8 4
Choir to Pedal 8 4
Positiv to Pedal 8
Bombarde to Pedal 8
Sanctuary Gr. to Ped. 8
Sanctuary Sw. to Ped. 8

Sanctuary Great expressive
16 Bourdon
8 Principal
8 Hohlflöte
8 Gemshorn
8 Gemshorn Celeste GG
4 Octave
4 Flûte Couverte
2 Blockflöte
IV Mixture 2
Tremulant
Great 16 8 4

Sanctuary Swell expressive
16 Holzgedeckt
8 Viole de Gambe
8 Viole Celeste GG
8 Holzgedeckt
4 Fugara
4 Flûte Octaviante
III Plein Jeu 2
16 Basset Horn
8 Trumpet
8 Oboe
Tremulant
Swell 16 8 4

Sanctuary Pedal
32 Resultant
16 Principal
16 Bourdon
16 Holzgedeckt
8 Octave
8 Flûte Conique
8 Holzgedeckt
4 Choralbass
4 Flûte Conique
2 Waldflöte
16 Basset Horn

Accessories & Controls
MIDI interface
Record/Playback device
Great/Choir Transfer
Sanctuary Organ Off
Gallery Organ Off
16 & 32 Silent
Reeds Silent
Mixtures Silent
5 Expression Pedals
All Swells to Swell
Cresc. Ped. becomes Sanctuary Great Expression
4 Programmable Crescendo settings
Programmable Full Organ

Combination Action
255 memory levels
Registration Sequencer
12 General Pistons, thumb & toe
8 Great Pistons, thumb
8 Swell Pistons, thumb
8 Choir Pistons, thumb
6 Positiv Pistons, thumb
6 Bomb. Pistons, thumb
4 Sanc. Gr. Pistons, thumb
4 Sanc. Sw. Pistons, thumb
8 Pedal Pistons, toe
General Cancel; Setter
Keycheek Pistons:
Ped Combs to Great
Ped Combs to Swell
Ped Combs to Choir
Ped Combs to Bombarde

26 Reversible Pistons, various functions
Two Identical Consoles, Gallery, Sanctuary

Windpressures:
Great: 4" & 5" flues; 5" reed; 15" State Trumpet
Swell: 5"; Choir: 4"; Positiv: 3"
Bombarde: 8" flues; 6" orch. reeds; 15" chorus reeds; 18" Tuba
Pedal: 5" flues & reeds; 15" Contre Bombarde
Sanctuary Great: 4"; Sanctuary Swell: 5"; Sanctuary Pedal: 5"

Christ Lutheran Church, Baltimore, Maryland
Andover Organ Co., Op. 114

81 stops, 82 ranks, 4,331 pipes, 2005 (gallery) and 2007 (chancel)

CHANCEL KEYDESK

Great
16 Violone
16 Principal
8 Principal
8 Principal II (ext. 16)
8 Chimney Flute
8 Viol dAmour
5-1/3 Gross Quinte
4 Octave
4 Flauto Traverse
3-1/5 Gross Tierce (prep.)
2-2/3 Twelfth
2 Fifteenth
IV Mixture
III Cymbal
III Cornet MC
16 Trumpet
8 Trumpet
8 Tromba (floating)
Swell to Great
Positiv to Great
Gallery to Great

Swell

16 Bourdon
8 Principal
8 Salicional
8 Voix celeste
8 Stopped Diapason
4 Principal
4 Silver Flute
2-2/3 Nazard
2 Block Flute
l-3/5 Tierce
IV Mixture 2
16 Fagott
8 Trompette
8 Oboe
8 Vox Humana
4 Clarion
8 Tromba (floating)
Tremolo
Gallery to Swell

Positiv

8 Principal
8 Gedeckt
8 Gemshorn
4 Principal
4 Koppel Flute
2 Octave
1-1/3 Larigot
III Sesquialtera
IV Scharff 1
8 Cromorne
8 Tromba (floating)
Tremolo
Zimbelstern
Swell to Positiv
Gallery to Positiv

Pedal
32 Grand Bourdon (ext. Sub Bass)
16 Principal Bass
16 Principal (Gt.)
16 Sub Bass
16 Bourdon (Sw.)
10 Contra Quint (Sw. Bourdon)
8 Octave
8 Gedeckt Bass
8 Bourdon (Sw.)
5-1/3 Quint
4 Choralbass
IV Mixture 2
32 Contra Trombone (prep.)
16 Trombone
16 Fagott (Sw.)
8 Trumpet
4 Clarionet
Great to Pedal
Swell to Pedal
Positiv to Pedal
Gallery to Pedal

Gallery Division

16 Bourdon
8 Principal
8 Concert Flute
8 Gedeckt (ext. 16 Bour.)
8 Dulciana
4 Octave
4 Night Horn
2 Fifteenth
IV Mixture
16 Trumpet (ext. 8)
8 Trumpet
8 Tromba (floating)
Zimbelstern

Gallery Pedal
16 Bourdon
8 Principal
8 Flute
4 Octave
16 Trumpet
8 Trumpet
8 Tromba (floating)

360 levels of memory
Registration Sequencer
12 General Pistons or Toe Studs
6 Divisional Pistons or Toe Studs
Coupler Reversibles on Pistons and Toe Studs
Sforzando Reversible (settable)
Zimbelstern Reversible
General Cancel, Setter
Console Separation

GALLERY CONSOLE
Manual I
16 Bourdon
8 Principal
8 Concert Flute
8 Gedeckt
4 Octave
IV Mixture
16 Trumpet
8 Trumpet
8 Tromba
Man. II to Man. I
Chancel Great to Manual I
Chancel Swell to Manual I
Chancel Positiv to Manual I

Manual II
8 Gedeckt
8 Dulciana
4 Night Horn
2 Fifteenth
8 Trumpet
8 Tromba
Zymbelstern
Chancel Great to Manual II
Chancel Swell to Manual II
Chancel Pos. to Man. II

Pedal
16 Bourdon
8 Principal
8 Gedeckt
4 Octave
16 Trumpet
8 Trumpet
Manual I to Pedal
Manual II to Pedal
Gallery Manual I Off
Gallery Manual II Off
Chancel Pedal to Pedal
Chancel Great to Pedal
Chancel Swell to Pedal
Chancel Positiv to Ped.

8 levels of memory
8 General Pistons and Toe Studs
4 Divisional Pistons and Toe Studs
12 Chancel Organ General Pistons
Coupler Reversibles, Sforzando Rev.
General Cancel, Chancel Cancel, Setter
Chancel manuals have mechanical suspended key action.
Chancel Pedal has electric key action.
Gallery has electric key action.
Couplers are operated electrically.

Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church, Baltimore, Maryland
1931 Skinner Organ Co., Op. 839

Stoplist nomenclature as found on the console rebuilt 2005 by Di Gennaro-Hart Organ Co. with added couplers & features

Great Man. 2
16 Double Diapason
8 First Diapason
8 Second Diapason
8 Harmonic Flute
4 Octave
4 Flute
2-2/3 Twelfth
2 Fifteenth
8 Tromba
Chimes
Midi
Great 16 8 4
Swell to Great 16 8 4
Choir to Great 16 8 4
Solo to Great 16 8 4
Great on Solo
Great/Choir Transfer

Choir Man 1
, enclosed
16 Contra Gamba
8 Geigen Principal
8 Concert Flute
8 Dulciana
8 Unda Maris
4 Flute
2-2/3 Nazard
8 Clarinet
Harp
Celesta
Tremolo
Midi
Choir 16 8 4
Swell to Choir 16 8 4
Solo to Choir

Swell Man. 3, enclosed
8 Diapason
8 Rohrflöte
8 Salicional
8 Voix Celeste
8 Flute Celeste II
4 Octave
4 Triangle Flute
V Mixture
16 Waldhorn
8 Trumpet
8 Oboe dAmour
8 Vox Humana
4 Clarion
Tremolo
Swell 16 8 4

Solo Man 4, enclosed
8 Flauto Mirabilis
8 Gamba
8 Gamba Celeste
8 French Horn
8 English Horn
8 Tuba Mirabilis
Tremolo
Chimes
Solo 16 8 4
Midi

Pedal
32 Contra Bourdon (derived)
16 First Diapason
16 Contra Bass
16 Double Diapason GR
16 Bourdon
16 Contra Gamba CH
8 Octave (ext First Diap)
8 Gedeckt (ext Bdn)
16 Trombone
16 Waldhorn SW
8 Tromba
Chimes
Midi
Pedal Divide
Great to Pedal 8 4
Swell to Pedal 8 4
Choir to Pedal 8 4
Solo to Pedal 8 4

Combinations
99 Memory Levels
16 Gen. Pistons Thumb, 8 Toe
8 Solo Thumb Pistons
8 Swell Thumb Pistons
8 Great Thumb Pistons
8 Choir Thumb Pistons
5 Pedal Toe Pistons
Registration Sequencer
Next and Previous Pistons, Thumb and Toe
Capture Piston, Gen. Cancel
All Swells to Swell
Sforzando
MIDI In, Out
Performance Record/Playback

Mount Calvary Roman Catholic Church (formerly Episcopal), Baltimore, Maryland
1961 Andover Organ Co. (C. B. Fisk, owner), Op. 35, with Flentrop Orgelbouw


Hoovdwerk
Man. II
16 Bourdon
8 Prestant
8 Roerfluit
8 Fluitdous
4 Octaaf
4 Spitsfluit
2-2/3 Quint
2 Superoctaaf
2 Blokfluit
IV Mixtuur
III Cymbaal
III Cornet
8 Trompet (en chamade)
Rugwerk/Hoovdwerk

Rugwerk
Man. I
8 Holpijp
8 Quintadeen
4 Prestant
4 Roerpijp
2-2/3 Nasard
2 Octaaf
1-3/5 Terts
1-1/3 Quinta
1 Siffluit
III Scherp
8 Krumhoorn

Pedaal

16 Subbas
16 Lieflijk Gedekt
8 Octaaf
8 Gedektpommer
4 Superoctaaf
4 Vlakfluit
2 Nachthoorn
IV Ruispijp
IV Mixtuur
16 Fagot
8 Trompet
8 Schalmei
Rugwerk/Pedaal

Zymbelstern

Compass Manuals 56 notes, Pedal 32 notes
Wind Pressure 1" manuals, 2" pedal

Writes Rupert Gough in a *****Five Star Review in Choir & Organ, May/June 2016:
This is not a disc for the faint-hearted; however, those interested in how composers have really pushed the boundaries of tonal possibilities from pipe organs will find a very intelligently put together recording. Pieces like Ligeti’s Harmonies require an assistant to manipulate the wind reservoirs and Robert Cogan’s No attack of organic metals includes pre-recorded electromechanical sounds. Using four different instruments, Diane Luchese aims to represent organ design aesthetics across 75 years in this ‘Progressive Recital’. Her copious sleeve notes really help the listener to gain a proper insight into the music and, naturally, the performances are delivered with persuasive conviction.

Writes Robert Matthew-Walker in The Organ:

    Here is a truly fascinating record, which will have great appeal not only for those interested in the rich variety of the instruments themselves, demonstrating the art of the organ builder in America (1931-2007) but also for those equally interested in discovering more about relatively recent organ music by a wide variety of composers.
    It is also a clever admixture of four significant instruments within the same city, in various admire (sic) places of worship, and one has to say, from the opening music of Messiaen’s 'Adoro te’ from the Saint Sacrement book, finely contrasted with music of his pupil Jean-Louis Florentz, to such remarkably non-traditional pieces as Robert Cogan’s ‘No Attack of Organic
Metals’, requiring rather more than two hands and two feet, the result will come as something of a revelation to many.
    A relatively short review, such as this inevitably is, cannot do much more than point the interested listener in the direction of seeking new experiences, and radical young composers
will doubtless wish to experience the wide range of invention which this unique recording exhibits.
    This is not a record for what might be termed the traditional organ music enthusiast, but those keen to explore some of the more recent and essentially experimental pieces — alongside music by more established living international figures — are strongly urged to explore the unqieu (sic) qualities this recording possesses.
    There can be no doubt that Diana Luchese’s performances are infused with commitment and a desire to make this music more widely-known, and the actual recording quality throughout these four venues is exemplary, as is the presentation and detailed documentation of the instruments.

Writes Robert Delcamp in The American Record Guide, July/August 2016:
     In the words of the booklet notes "This CD aspires to create a kind of time capsule that both samples eclectic compositional styles of the past 50 years and captures a few varied examples of pipe organs one might typically encounter in a representative American city."
     Both goals are admirably attained. The performer plays on four organs in Baltimore and offers an astonishing variety of works that explore every possible tonal aspect of the organs. The instruments include two by Andover, a 1931 EM Skinner, and the 2007 rebuild by Schantz of the 1959 Moeller in the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen.
     The organs, recording, and playing are all superlative. Luchese understands this music and plays it with conviction and virtuosity. This is a recording for the intrepid listener who seeks a comprehensive survey of avant-garde organ music. The booklet offers extensive notes on the music and organ specifications.

Light and Dark and In Between: 4 Organs in Baltimore<BR>Diane Luchese, Organist<BR><Font Color=Red>*****Five Star Review, <I>Choir & Organ</font></I>
Click to enlarge
Currently, you have 0 quantity of this product in your shopping cart
   Customers who bought this product also purchased   
Music for the Testaments Old and New<BR>Laura Ellis, Organist<BR>2015 Reuter Renovation of 99-Rank, 5m organ, Univ. of Florida<BR><font color=red><I><B>2 CDs for the Price of One</I></B></font>
Music for the Testaments Old and New
Laura Ellis, Organist
2015 Reuter Renovation of 99-Rank, 5m organ, Univ. of Florida
2 CDs for the Price of One
Messiaen: Prélude · Messe de la Pentecôte · L’Ascension<BR>Jon Gillock, Organist<BR>2011 Pascal Quoirin Organ, 111 ranks, Church of the Ascension, New York
Messiaen: Prélude · Messe de la Pentecôte · L’Ascension
Jon Gillock, Organist
2011 Pascal Quoirin Organ, 111 ranks, Church of the Ascension, New York
Organ Music of René Louis Becker, Vol. 3<BR>Damin Spritzer, Organist<BR><Font color = red><B>1938 Kimball 113 ranks, St. John's Cathedral, Denver</B></font>
Organ Music of René Louis Becker, Vol. 3
Damin Spritzer, Organist
1938 Kimball 113 ranks, St. John's Cathedral, Denver
Virgil Fox Remembered<BR>Peter Richard Conte Plays the Wanamaker Organ<BR>464 Ranks in the Macy's Department Store, Philadelphia<BR><font color = red><I>****4-star review in Choir & Organ!; "One big bundle of joy" reviews Organists' Review</I></font>
Virgil Fox Remembered
Peter Richard Conte Plays the Wanamaker Organ
464 Ranks in the Macy's Department Store, Philadelphia
****4-star review in Choir & Organ!; "One big bundle of joy" reviews Organists' Review
Organ Works of Leo Sowerby, Lorenz Maycher, Organist<BR><font color=red><I>"It is difficult to imagine anyone not falling in love with this exciting disc . . ."</I></font> American Record Guide
Organ Works of Leo Sowerby, Lorenz Maycher, Organist
"It is difficult to imagine anyone not falling in love with this exciting disc . . ." American Record Guide
Organ Music of René Louis Becker, Vol. 2<BR>Damin Spritzer, Organist<BR><Font color = red><B>****Four-Star Review in <I>Choir & Organ</I></B>, "Spritzer proves a committed and eloquent advocate . . ."</font>
Organ Music of René Louis Becker, Vol. 2
Damin Spritzer, Organist
****Four-Star Review in Choir & Organ, "Spritzer proves a committed and eloquent advocate . . ."

Copyright © 2017 Raven Recordings